Employment Terms & Motivation

Posted on

Welcoming New Staff Most managers want new staff to have a positive experience of their recruitment and acceptance of the offer of a job. Employees will not resign usually from their current job until they receive a clear offer of the new job. To provide reassurance, give both the job offer and details of their terms at the same time. You can turn that into a more motivating experience by a simple action. Phone the individual to check that he/she has received the offer and details and ask if he has any questions about the particulars of employment. This allows […]

Older Employees – Organisational Asset or Liability?

Posted on

Shortage of People and Skills Ahead In recent years the focus has been on apprenticeships and job opportunities for young people, which are both important.  However, that has distracted managers from another pressing issue – the skills and ‘corporate glue’ provided by older workers.  The number of young people coming into the workforce is shrinking.  By 2022, 14.5 million more jobs will be created, but only 7 million younger workers will enter the workforce – a gap of 7.5 million.  By 2020, the over 50s will comprise almost one third of the working age population and almost half of the […]

The Minimum Wage has a Nasty Bite

Posted on

True Cause or Excuse The minimum wage is well known but there are still some employers, across many sectors, who choose to skate on thin ice.   Those organisations fail to pay the correct amount because of: Insufficient funds; Failure to take into account all the operational hours expected of staff; Ignorance; An “I’ll chance it” attitude. The latter is more prevalent than I thought judging by conversations with employees and managers.  HMRC has the power to deal with miscreant senior managers by naming and shaming the company and taking action to penalise the organisation.  Let us hope that HMRC pursues […]

Balancing the Need for Operational Flexibility and Staffing Flexibility unlike Sports Direct

Posted on

Unfortunately, Sports Direct hit the headlines for the wrong reasons but their underlying aims may not be so different to many organisations in the private and public sectors.  Managers at Sports Direct went about it in the wrong way. Statistics from ONS indicate that employment on zero hours contracts has risen by 21% year on year and 903,000 individuals have such contracts. This may raise a cry that such contracts should be halted in the light of the inquiry into Sports Direct but many organisations need flexibility in staffing to accommodate seasonal and other variations in workload and staff holidays […]

ACAS Disciplinary Code Diluted

Posted on

This article was first published in our temporary blog When the unfair dismissal legislation was introduced in 1974, the onus was on the employer to demonstrate that the reason for dismissal was fair in all the circumstances and that a fair procedure had been adopted when deciding whether or not to dismiss an individual. The effectiveness of the Code and the safeguards it contained are being diluted by recent decisions of the Courts and it is likely that some employers will come to grief as they find themselves at sea so to speak. A Life Raft – The ACAS Code of […]

Postponing a Tribunal Hearing – 3rd Time You May Be Out

Posted on

Occasionally postponements are used to unsettle the other party. The main drawback of postponements is the lost time, the need to rearrange appointments and the waste of tribunal time and accommodation if a new case can not be slotted into the gap. Three Strikes and Out The number of times an employer or claimant can postpone a hearing is being subject to stricter control from 6th April 2016. In future, an application for a third postponement may only be approved in limited circumstances: All the parties consent to the postponement and “it is practicable and appropriate for the purposes of […]

Junior Doctors’ Dispute re Pay and Working Hours

Posted on

In our first article about the junior doctors’ pay and hours dispute, we queried whether the negotiators for the doctors will avoid the mistakes of previous years.  Those agreements left some junior doctors in specialities, such as general medicine, feeling the deal was unfair as colleagues, in other specialities, were not liable to be called in after hours as often but earned more.  You can read that article on our Facebook business page and also on this blog by clicking on this link. This article looks at the dispute from a different but important angle. Shorter Working Hours – Adverse […]

Temporary Respite in Costs of Auto-Enrolment Pension Schemes

Posted on

Our earlier article ‘Living Wage has Hidden Costs for Employees and Employers’ has been updated to reflect the Chancellor’s intention to postpone the rise in minimum pension contributions from both employer and employees.  The postponement will be for 6 months.  The increases will take place in April 2018 and 2019 instead of October 2017 and 2018. Sting in the Tail for Employees? Staff may find that their take home pay is less than expected from any pay rise from the employer and/or the increase, next April, in the National Minimum Wage to £7.20 per hour for those aged 25 or […]

Living Wage has Hidden Costs for Employees and Employers

Posted on

This month, the Living Wage Foundation announced that over 2,000 employers have signed up to pay the Living Wage.  That sounds good but does that bode well for employees and employers – have the hidden costs been glossed over? Individuals should be paid a fair wage for their skills/effort provided they maintain such skillls, are flexible and work in the interests of their employer.   The living wage is currently a minimum of £9.40 per hour in London and £8.25 for the rest of the country. Employers who sign up to the living wage code may have several reasons such as: […]